Anna Woolerton

The Pollination Centre - Seeds for a New Age

The Pollination Centre will be the UKs first experimental station to cultivate new kinds of exotic but home grown fruits and vegetables. Through the cross pollination of selected British and South American varieties, supermarket shelves could, one day, be filled with hybrid crops that cater to the increased demand of British consumers for exotic foods without the wasteful food miles. 

 The site at Greenham Common is a large area of open heathland and is valued regionally as a wildlife haven, supporting a number of endangered species. Thriving on acidic and low nutrient soils, heathlands across the UK are facing pressing challenges of eutrophication which is caused by the worldwide phenomenon of atmospheric nitrogen deposition. 

 A significant contributor to the release of nitrogen can be measured in the form of Food Miles which, due to globalisation, have increased in the UK by 400% since 1960. With rising demand for exotic superfoods, food miles are continuing to accumulate putting the future of our heathlands at risk.  

 At a site specific level, within a sensitive heathland site, the development will also demonstrate low impact in terms of siting and form and will operate sustainably under the established principles of forest gardening. 

Foodmiles, Nitrogen deposition, Cross Pollination, Hybrid Species, Protect

The Pollination Centre will be the UKs first experimental station to cultivate new kinds of exotic but home grown fruits and vegetables. Through the cross pollination of selected British and South American varieties, supermarket shelves could, one day, be filled with hybrid crops that cater to the increased demand of British consumers for exotic foods without the wasteful food miles. 

 The site at Greenham Common is a large area of open heathland and is valued regionally as a wildlife haven, supporting a number of endangered species. Thriving on acidic and low nutrient soils, heathlands across the UK are facing pressing challenges of eutrophication which is caused by the worldwide phenomenon of atmospheric nitrogen deposition. 

 A significant contributor to the release of nitrogen can be measured in the form of Food Miles which, due to globalisation, have increased in the UK by 400% since 1960. With rising demand for exotic superfoods, food miles are continuing to accumulate putting the future of our heathlands at risk.  

 At a site specific level, within a sensitive heathland site, the development will also demonstrate low impact in terms of siting and form and will operate sustainably under the established principles of forest gardening. 

Foodmiles, Nitrogen deposition, Cross Pollination, Hybrid Species, Protect